Measuring success in self-publishing

taleist_self-publishing_survey_1Not a Gold Rush is the name of a 2012 survey about the success of those who publish their own work. One of the authors of the study, Steven Lewis, has written this great article digging into some key findings.

Here’s what I take out of it:

  1. The best results come to authors with more writing experience, especially those who have been published before and (presumably) learned from that experience.
  2. Authors who spent more, earned more. Self-publishing is not a solo effort: you need to bring in specialists in editorial, design, marketing.
  3. To succeed, you will benefit from a) having strong experience – either your own or your team, and b) resources – like those higher-earning authors, invest in your book.
  4. Romance writers are on a good thing!

Over at Red Hill Publishing, we are working on a new website that will reveal a whole suite of services for self-publishers that will give them the edge in this market. I’ll be telling your more about that over the next few months.

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Why I Couldn’t Afford NOT to Go to a Ghostwriters’ Conference

ghostwriters 2I am excited that I will soon be speaking at Ghostwriters Unite! (GW), the first book industry conference of its kind.

Few people question going to BookExpo America, a writers convention or a general publishing conference. But why go to one like this?

GW covers more than ghostwriting. It features a number of professionals across industries, including publishers, literary agents, screenwriters, public relations managers, photographers, and marketers.

I’m going so that I keep my finger on the pulse of the overall book industry and hear about all the latest developments in traditional, indie, and self-publishing; to learn about best practices in manuscript development and marketing; and to see what has worked for others in business (and what hasn’t).

Overall, I’m going to learn how to better serve the authors and publisher with whom I work.

But while the great lineup of panelists and speakers (of which I am one) is certainly a draw, the informal conversations in back hallways and at lunch may be just as valuable—if not more so.

True, much of the book industry happens digitally today. But there is still no substitute for meeting like-minded professionals face-to-face. Conferences give us a place to sit down across from our counterparts, without the constraints of keyboards, clients, and kids in the background.

It is a great opportunity for all of us to share what we’ve learned through our experience and to help each other. Those of us who have had success in our profession want to reach back to new and rising stars in the book industry and help them along their way. We all have something to learn and we all have something to contribute.

The book business is like no other. We are a unique assortment of literary artists, entrepreneurs, professionals, and creative individuals who need the give and take of community.

If you have yet to register for this groundbreaking industry event, come as my guest! When you register at ghostwritersunite.com, use promo code GU13WAM for $50 off your registration fees.

I knew I couldn’t afford to miss this great conference. You can’t either.

Go to ghostwritersunite.com and be part of history in the making!