In memory of John Bean

Last week, the world lost three talented men. In a helicopter crash near Lake Eyre, an ABC news team perished. On board were journalist Paul Lockyer, pilot Gary Ticehurst and cameraman John Bean. Read more

It could have been anybody’s child

Sophie’s Journey tells of a child’s resilience, of the choice between life and death, and of a strength that prevails through suffering. Sophie Delezio has a message of hope for us all. This is her story.

Ten days before Christmas. A room of children, napping on mattresses in their childcare centre, waiting for Santa to arrive. It’s a peaceful scene. Until a car crashes through the doors at head height, smashing into the midst of the sleeping children. The engine revs faster and faster; flames lick the ceiling.

Incredibly, no child was killed at the Roundhouse Childcare Centre on 15 December 2003. But Sophie Delezio bears the legacy of that day written on her body. Sophie suffered third-degree burns to 85 per cent of her body in the fire. She lost both feet, some fingers, and her right ear.

Her survival was a miracle to many. Two years later, the unthinkable happens: Sophie is hit by a car, and once again left with near-fatal injuries. Yet again, she defies the odds and survives.

Sophie’s Journey is available now from all good book retailers, both bricks and mortar and online.

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Can good things emerge – unexpectedly – from the cancer journey?

Featuring deeply personal insights from author Stephanie Dowrick, Sass & Bide founder Heidi Middleton and former Australian cricketer and AFL player Simon O’Donnell amongst many others, Positive represents a collection of 50 voices: cancer survivors‚ carers‚ partners‚ parents‚ siblings. Together‚ their stories map out the terrain of the upside of cancer the opportunity to draw together (as friends, as a couple, as a family); the torrent of support, love and prayers that are unleashed; the impetus to go deeper and embrace the strength, fears and purpose that lie within each of us.

Positive is available now from all good book retailers, both bricks and mortar and online.

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You can’t hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk

Kids tell it like it is. And they know some very useful stuff indeed. Such as the fact that you can’t hide a piece of broccoli in a glass of milk. Or it’s never a good idea to try to baptise a cat.

Our children are bursting to share commonsense advice that will help us grown-ups get through the day with a smile on our faces. Smart, warm, telling and funny, The World According to Kids captures a beautiful sense of the world seen from knee height.

Some of the contributors to this book have just learned to talk, others have been at it for a decade or so, but they all have something to say that will brighten your day.

The World According to Kids is available now from all good book retailers, both bricks and mortar and online.

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The book for parents who want to get the joy back in their lives

Parenting with Soul won’t tell you what to believe, but it will show you how to make spirituality part of your family’s life. It’s about seeing the sacred in our homes and turning the things we do each day into opportunities to practice mindfulness, gratitude, love, generosity, and other soul qualities.

Parenting with Soul is about (re)discovering your own inner life as a parent. It’s about finding your purpose and direction again when you lose it at the bottom of the laundry basket. It’s about finding ways of living with soul – depth, richness and authenticity – in the midst of this messy, noisy, crazy life that is our birthright as parents.

Parenting with Soul is available now from all good book retailers, both bricks and mortar and online.

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You’ll want the pink party bag, won’t you?

Not so long ago, I wrote about my six-year-old daughter’s ambition to be a builder. Cunning inventions made from sunglasses and old CDs attached with straw flow from her fingers, and nothing makes her happier than a new box of Lego. She is also uncannily gifted at Monopoly, so I look forward to enjoying old age supported by my wealthy and astute property developer of a daughter.  Read more

Want less – freedom for children and parents

I went to the supermarket the other week with two kids in tow. Mostly I try to do the grocery shopping by myself. Not just because I don’t want to manage toilet breaks, hunger pangs and trolley rage – yes, that’s the kids I’m talking about, not me – but because I really quite enjoy supermarkets. I get a kick out of doing per-gram price comparisons, and speculating whether the tin with the redder tomatoes on the label is really likely to deliver the goods. Tragic, I know. Read more